Romans 10:9-13; John 3:16-21

A Silken Thread by Kim Vogel Sawyer

I received an advance reader copy of A Silken Thread from Waterbrook, a division of Penguin Random House, LLC, in exchange for an honest review.

A Silken Thread was about Laurel Millard and her plans to capture a wealthy suitor who can afford care for her mother and give Laurel the life she dreams about.  She gets hired as a silk weaver at the Atlanta Cotton Exposition of 1895, and works at a loom most of the day, making lengths of silk for display and educational purposes aimed at the visitors to the Silk Room at the Exposition.

Laurel meets Willie Sharp, a security guard at the exposition,  Langdon Rochester, the son of the owner of Rochester Steam Engines company, and a few young women who work with her in the Silk Room, giving guided tours of that area.  She also meets Quincy, a friend of Willie’s, who is hired as a groundskeeper at the exposition.

The book is well written, and the characters all connect nicely with each other.  Mrs. Sawyer is skilled in blending the stories of each person into a good, solid historical fiction tale, which keeps the reader interested and engaged.   I thoroughly appreciated her use of the King James bible when she wrote Scriptures into the stories, and she placed them appropriately.  They added so much value to the whole book.    I also liked the information about the Cotton Exposition, how the grounds were described in detail, which gave me a good picture of what they must have looked like.

Mrs. Sawyer dealt with racism in the book, too.  In my opinion, she portrayed one character in particular well, and gave him insightful thought processing, which helped him overcome some things.  Each character, really, matured and became more experienced in their views of life, and how people act.  I liked the book, and do recommend it to anyone wanting a clean historical fiction story, with very little romance in it, and a LOT of substance!

Advertisements

Book Launching and Book Reviewing

Pretty soon, I’ll be reading these 2 new books, for Bethany House, and the other from Waterbrook and Multnomah!  One is THE TINDERBOX, by Beverly Lewis, and the other is

A SILKEN THREAD, by Kim Vogel Sawyer!  I’m really looking forward to reading both of these!  I love the storyline of Silken Thread, and I’ve almost always enjoyed Beverly Lewis’s  books.

Keep checking back for my reviews. THANKS!

Romans 10:  8-13;  John 3:16-21

 

Between Two Shores, by Jocelyn Green

Between Two Shores book review

This book was one of the best history lessons I’ve ever had. I knew almost nothing about the French and Indian war, which was a more of a war between the British colonies in America,and
the French. France eventually lost all Canadian land, and Britain got Florida and Upper Canada.
Jocelyn Green wrote about this war by introducing readers to Catherine Duval, the daughter of a
mixed race marriage, who was half French and half Mohawk. Catherine was a trader with
both the British and the French, and she managed a store on Lachine Island in Canada, along
with her abusive alcoholic father, and her sister Bright Star. A young woman named Thankful also
lived there, and her story is worth learning about, too. I won’t give it away here, though.
Catherine continues to trade and make money, until Samuel Crane, her ex-fiance shows up, and claims to have some secret information that he needs to share with a British officer. He needs Catherine to help
him deliver that information, and she is drawn to help Samuel because her people are starving
and the war is looming closer to her home.

 
This story takes you on a really intense and interesting journey through the lands and rivers
of Canada. During the trip, you almost feel as if you were part of the group, and when
a surprise turn of events happens, it’s really startling. Jocelyn Green is a talented storyteller,
weaving tons of facts into the lives of her characters, all of whom were inspired by the experiences of
real people.
This book also tells you about how God loves you, and sent His only Son, Jesus Christ, as a ransom
for many, to redeem you and set you free from sin.  That is the most important part of this book.

If you like Christian historical fiction, this would be
a good book for you to read.
I was part of Mrs. Green’s launch team, and was given a free copy of her book, in exchange for
a review and promotion of the book. My review is honest and totally my own.
Romans 10:9-13; John 3:16-21

Ribbon of Gold, by Cathy Marie Hake ~ book review

Ribbon of Gold by Cathy Marie Hake is part of a 4-novella book, called Woven Hearts.  Ribbon of Gold is about Isabel Shaw, a young woman who works at Stedman Mills in Massachusetts, weaving thirty-inch wide shirting on industrial sized looms.  She had left her family’s farm in New Hampshire to work at the textile mill so she could put money aside for her brother’s education.

Carter Stedman, the mill owner’s son, takes over running the operations, and is angered at the inhumane working conditions there.  He goes about righting the wrongs of his father, now deceased, and in the process, becomes enamored with Isabel.

The story is clean, and a comfortable read for any Christian woman.  The relationships in the story are interesting.   I liked the details Mrs. Hake included in Ribbon of Gold, which gives the reader a good picture of how it was to work in the cotton mills in 1846.

Daughter of the Loom, by Tracie Peterson and Judith Miller

book review Daughter of the Loom
by Tracie Peterson and Judith Miller

This book was excellent, well written and a good story plot that developed
and kept going in a way that kept me interested all the way through.
This is part of the 3 books, Bells of Lowell series, and this is book one.
The story takes place in 1828, in Lowell, Massachusetts, during the Industrial Revolution
of America. In Chapter One, the main character, Lilly Armbruster, is portrayed as a
determined, but struggling displaced farm girl, who is forced to work in the new
weaving mills because the land her parent’s farm was on was bought, and then developed
for industrial uses. She’s angry, and grieving, because her life has been drastically changed,
and her dad recently died, after her mother.
Other characters are Matthew Cheever,part of the organization that
is running the Lowell mills, Kirk Boott, mill owner, Addie and Mintie, sisters who run
separate boarding houses for the mill workers, and various young women who live
at the boardinghouse, and work in the same mill as Lilly.


The Christian perspective is intertwined in the story, and a couple of times,
you are told how to be born again, and enter the Kingdom of God. Lilly struggles
with her faith at times, but she has a supportive group of people who show her
answers to her conflicts, eventually.
I highly recommend this book, it’s CLEAN Christian historical fiction, and you would
never be embarrassed to be seen reading it. No sexual situations, no questionable relationships. Those types of additions to Christian books just make it cheap and trashy, and, are
becoming somewhat common amongst SOME Christian author’s stories. This book, Daughter of the Loom, has no mention of
anything that conflicts with the Bible, as far as I can tell, so relax, and enjoy learning about the
development of Lowell Massachusetts during part of the Industrial Revolution. It’s a really
enjoyable read, and you can learn some real American history too.

Kirk Boott, Lowell industrialist and investor
child labor in the mills
mill workers in everyday work clothing

Wedded to War, by Jocelyn Green Book Review

Wedded to War takes place in New York, and Washington City, and in Virginia,  from 1861 to 1862, and is focused on the Civil War, and the women who became nurses at that time.  This book is extremely interesting, and well written, with plenty of facts and a good story woven about each character.

Some of the characters are:  Charlotte Waverly, the main person in this book,

Alice, her sister, Phineas Hastings, the beau of Charlotte, Caleb Lansing, a family friend and a doctor in the Civil War, Caroline Waverly, Charlotte and Alice’s mother, Ruby O’Flannery and her husband Matthew, Irish immigrants to New York, Frederick Olmstead, head of the Sanitary Commission in Washington City,  and Edward Goodrich, an Army Chaplain.

 

 

Every character’s story was absorbing, and I found it to be a real pleasure

to read the entire book.

This historical fiction book is inspired by one Civil War nurse, Georgeanna Woolsey, and a lot of research has been put into making this story as good as it is. Jocelyn Green is a talented author, and obviously a tenacious and insightful researcher.   I highly recommend this book, “Wedded to War”  to anyone interested in the Civil War, and the nurses of that time.  It gives a well-thought-out perspective to this time in American history.

Product Details:

Product details

  • Print Length: 400 pages
  • Publisher: River North; New edition (June 24, 2012)
  • Publication Date: June 24, 2012
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00836T5NG
  • Author, Jocelyn Greene: