Craft Night with Mrs. Nancy

I love doing crafts, and today (tonight) I’m going to show you how to make little flower pots.  Give them to a friend, display them on your desk at work, or give them to your mother on Mother’s Day, or her birthday!

Here’s how to make little clay pots look beautiful:

Supplies: 

A single can of Play-Doh, a bottle of matte acrylic quick drying acrylic paint,

a pair of wire cutters, some artificial flowers, SMALL, some scissors,  a sponge/foam

paint brush, and some tiny clay pots, or terra-cotta clay pots.  I mean, tiny.  Like, 3.5 inch

opening at the top.

Step One:  paint the pots, give them about 2 coats.

Step Two:  push some play doh into the bottom of the pot, after the paint has dried, of course

Step Three:  Cut the flowers to various heights, and use the extra leaves too, in your arrangement.

Step Four:  push the flower stems down into the play-doh, and use something to push the flower pretty

far down, to secure it into the playdoh.

Step Five:  take pictures and show me what you made!

My mini-flower arrangements: 

I made 2: 

Also, one of my brothers made me a Weed Vase, so I put the leftover lavender flowers into that, and

attached a butterfly I kept from a flower arrangement a neighbor sent me.  Isn’t that pretty cute?

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Ribbon of Gold, by Cathy Marie Hake ~ book review

Ribbon of Gold by Cathy Marie Hake is part of a 4-novella book, called Woven Hearts.  Ribbon of Gold is about Isabel Shaw, a young woman who works at Stedman Mills in Massachusetts, weaving thirty-inch wide shirting on industrial sized looms.  She had left her family’s farm in New Hampshire to work at the textile mill so she could put money aside for her brother’s education.

Carter Stedman, the mill owner’s son, takes over running the operations, and is angered at the inhumane working conditions there.  He goes about righting the wrongs of his father, now deceased, and in the process, becomes enamored with Isabel.

The story is clean, and a comfortable read for any Christian woman.  The relationships in the story are interesting.   I liked the details Mrs. Hake included in Ribbon of Gold, which gives the reader a good picture of how it was to work in the cotton mills in 1846.

Starting from Scratch ~ book review~

Starting from Scratch is enjoyable from start to finish. Entertaining and rich in details, Kate Lloyd masterfully weaves the lives of her characters into a captivating story, rewarding the reader with a highly satisfying read that is difficult to put down. When I finished the book I found I wanted to read more of Kate’s books, and God willing, I shall. Mrs. Lloyd truly has a God-given talent for writing, and I do hope to see many more books from her pen.

Starting from Scratch is told in first-person narrative, and the main character, 29-year-old, unmarried Eva Lapp, presents her day to day life in a way that authentically reflects her struggle

between staying with the Amish community, or cutting the ties and living in the verboten world of Englichers.

She is basically uprooted from her childhood home and relocated into a new job as the manager of a small cafe at a
plant nursery which is fairly close to her old home. I liked how she persevered, and how she handled
uncomfortable situations with

insight and good-natured repartee.

A little bit of romance, not too much, and a lot of skillful relationship building.
Truly a good, clean Christian fiction book about the Amish, I recommend this to anyone who enjoys
Christian fiction.

Starting from Scratch (Lancaster Discoveries Book 2), reads very nicely as a stand alone
novel, too.

Kate Lloyd, author of Starting from Scratch:  

Her Website:  http://katelloyd.com/

Kate’s Blog:  http://katelloyd.com/blog/  Connect with Kate:  https://twitter.com/KateLloydAuthor

Her pinterest pages: https://www.pinterest.com/katelloydauthor/

Kate Lloyd on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/katelloydauthor/

Daughter of the Loom, by Tracie Peterson and Judith Miller

book review Daughter of the Loom
by Tracie Peterson and Judith Miller

This book was excellent, well written and a good story plot that developed
and kept going in a way that kept me interested all the way through.
This is part of the 3 books, Bells of Lowell series, and this is book one.
The story takes place in 1828, in Lowell, Massachusetts, during the Industrial Revolution
of America. In Chapter One, the main character, Lilly Armbruster, is portrayed as a
determined, but struggling displaced farm girl, who is forced to work in the new
weaving mills because the land her parent’s farm was on was bought, and then developed
for industrial uses. She’s angry, and grieving, because her life has been drastically changed,
and her dad recently died, after her mother.
Other characters are Matthew Cheever,part of the organization that
is running the Lowell mills, Kirk Boott, mill owner, Addie and Mintie, sisters who run
separate boarding houses for the mill workers, and various young women who live
at the boardinghouse, and work in the same mill as Lilly.


The Christian perspective is intertwined in the story, and a couple of times,
you are told how to be born again, and enter the Kingdom of God. Lilly struggles
with her faith at times, but she has a supportive group of people who show her
answers to her conflicts, eventually.
I highly recommend this book, it’s CLEAN Christian historical fiction, and you would
never be embarrassed to be seen reading it. No sexual situations, no questionable relationships. Those types of additions to Christian books just make it cheap and trashy, and, are
becoming somewhat common amongst SOME Christian author’s stories. This book, Daughter of the Loom, has no mention of
anything that conflicts with the Bible, as far as I can tell, so relax, and enjoy learning about the
development of Lowell Massachusetts during part of the Industrial Revolution. It’s a really
enjoyable read, and you can learn some real American history too.

Kirk Boott, Lowell industrialist and investor
child labor in the mills
mill workers in everyday work clothing