Gladiolus

Spring Flowers

Matthew Chapter 628 And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:

29 And yet I say unto you, That even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.

These are photos of flowers in my yard, OR, taken at our local Lowe’s garden center.  The weather here is still not too hot or humid, although it’s getting there.  Enjoy God’s bountiful gifts!

This first one is magenta, it’s either Plum Tart or Gladiolus Isabella.

These are Gloriosas.  They’re either Gloriosa rothschildiana or Gloriosa Superba, also known as Gloriosa Lily, Glory Lily, flame lily, fire lily, gloriosa lily, superb lily, climbing lily, and creeping lily.

As you can see, these flowers will grow in rather sandy soil.

Those were from my garden.  The following photos are from Lowe’s garden center:

[9] That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.
[10] For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.
[11] For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.
[12] For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him.
[13] For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.

Craft Night with Mrs. Nancy

I love doing crafts, and today (tonight) I’m going to show you how to make little flower pots.  Give them to a friend, display them on your desk at work, or give them to your mother on Mother’s Day, or her birthday!

Here’s how to make little clay pots look beautiful:

Supplies: 

A single can of Play-Doh, a bottle of matte acrylic quick drying acrylic paint,

a pair of wire cutters, some artificial flowers, SMALL, some scissors,  a sponge/foam

paint brush, and some tiny clay pots, or terra-cotta clay pots.  I mean, tiny.  Like, 3.5 inch

opening at the top.

Step One:  paint the pots, give them about 2 coats.

Step Two:  push some play doh into the bottom of the pot, after the paint has dried, of course

Step Three:  Cut the flowers to various heights, and use the extra leaves too, in your arrangement.

Step Four:  push the flower stems down into the play-doh, and use something to push the flower pretty

far down, to secure it into the playdoh.

Step Five:  take pictures and show me what you made!

My mini-flower arrangements: 

I made 2: 

Also, one of my brothers made me a Weed Vase, so I put the leftover lavender flowers into that, and

attached a butterfly I kept from a flower arrangement a neighbor sent me.  Isn’t that pretty cute?

Where Lilacs Still Bloom, by Jane Kirkpatrick~book review

It is my opinion that Jane Kirkpatrick must be a woman with a very high I.Q. After reading some of her books, I believe she finds writing as an outlet for the restlessness that comes with being highly intelligent.
That being said, Mrs. Kirkpatrick has written a book that is about several people whose lives intersect
at some point, because of the dedication of Hulda Klager towards her lilacs, and her persistence in finding new, stronger varieties of lilacs.

It’s a pity some people might pass this book up, because they’ll miss learning about a German immigrant to America, who had a God-given talent for scientific gardening, and more than that, being a horticulturist, even though she never went past the 8th grade! Where Lilacs Still Bloom offers an abundance of hope, confidence, good life lessons, and a heart-warming look into the family and friends of this non-degreed greenskeeper and plant researcher.
This is a Christian historical fiction book, based on the true story and life of Hulda Klager.


The story starts in 1889, when Hulda was pregnant with their fourth child, and they’re getting ready to move to a farm.
You get to know her, and her husband Frank, who live on a farm in Washington state. She learns, from her dad, about grafting apple shoots onto saplings, and from that, she finds she can actually “invent” a better variety of apple, on that will peel more easily and taste more tart. You meet their children, and the other children who, by God’s wisdom, come to work and live on her farm, and learn about cross-pollination, soil management, and a host of other important details attached to Hulda’s life’s work. 

I can’t say enough good about this book! It’s easy to read, very interesting and full of facts, and written in such a way as to encourage readers to perhaps learn a bit more about the propagation of flowers, or discover and visit arboretums in the USA. There’s plenty of information to get you going, if you’re the least bit curious about learning more. I got really excited about it when Hulda successfully hybridized a new variety of lilac, and when she talked to famous authors such as Luther Burbank, who was a renowned hybridizer at the time.

One more thing, The Hulda Klager Lilac Gardens are now a national historic site!

The Lilac Gardens are located off I-5 exit 21, 30 minutes north of Portland, Oregon or 2.5 hours south of Seattle, Washington at 115 South Pekin Road, Woodland, Washington 98674. (Our mailing address is PO Box 828). The Gardens are open to the public most days of the year from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., with a $3.00 gate fee payable at the gate ($5 during lilac days, children 12 and under free) If you’d like to contact them, here are some
email addresses I got from their website: Contact the Lilac Gardens
HKLGTours@gmail.com Schedule bus/large group tours during Lilac Days
WoodlandLilacGardens@gmail.com Lilac Gardens publicity
HKLGPresident@gmail.com President, Hulda Klager Lilac Gardens Society
HKLGMembership@gmail.com Membership, Hulda Klager Lilac Gardens Society
HKLGGiftShop@gmail.com Gift Shop – open during Lilac Days only
HKLGHistoricHome@gmail.com Hulda’s home – open during Lilac Days only

Get a copy of Where Lilacs Still Bloom, and have a lovely time of reading about this nurturing and dedicated housewife who became famous just from cultivating her own flowers.

Thank you, Jane, for writing this book.  (no more whining from me! LOL)

Romans 10:9-13;  John 3:16-21

Early Spring Gardening

Today I planted some Echinacea seeds from Ferry Morse, in a 70 pellet Jiffy Seed Starter tray I got from Lowe’s.  The tray is super easy to use, just pour water in the empty spaces on each side, and let the pellets plump up.  Then, you might need to tear back some of the netting, to plant each seed, but after that, set the tray outdoors for sun, and keep the pellets watered.

These seeds should sprout in about 10-12 days.  Hoping.

I’m hoping to get all of these plants into the ground this week, and get the garden weeded and mulched.  Here in the South it’s spring, and pollen time, and time to plant your gardens.  Flowers for the garden:

Athena Sun Euryops

Archangel Angelonia

Silky Deep Red Milkweed

Belleza Dark Pink Gaura

Pentas

Dianthus and Dusty Miller