Non-Alcoholic Bananas Foster Sauce

Tonight I made bananas foster sauce, with NO alcohol, nor with the rum extract. I just can’t stand the taste of alcohol in my food. (I don’t drink, either, neither did my dad)
After browsing several recipes, I saw that all of them have 4 of the same basic ingredients, so I got out my
saucepan, a banana from Walmart, and the other ingredients.

Before that, I wondered, “What’s the difference between caramel sauce, and non-alkie bananas foster sauce, besides the banana?”
But, I digress.

I made the sauce, using
real salted butter, and plenty of it     

2 tablespoons to caramelize the bananas, and 2 or 3 for the sauce
3/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon or so of ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon or so of regular iodized table salt
a banana, sliced
2 tablespoons of whole milk

First, cut the banana in slices, then melt a couple of tablespoons of
butter and a teaspoon of dark brown sugar in the saucepan. Cook the banana slices, flipping them over once. Pour them onto a plate, and set aside.

Next, start melting a couple of tablespoons more of butter in the saucepan, dump the
brown sugar (3/4 cup packed), cinnamon, about a half teaspoon, and salt (about a half a teaspoon)
and stir that over medium high heat, adding the milk. Stir, stir, stir, until it’s bubbly but not boiling.
Add the bananas, and stir a little while longer, maybe a minute or so, then take it all off the burner.
My banana slices kind of melted, or something, but that added a lot of flavor to the sauce!

Here’s the sauce, using my recipe!


Let it cool a bit, then dip your spoon in, and taste it. Share it with your husband, or a family
member who appreciates this yummy stuff.
I’m telling you, this recipe is DELICIOUS!!

I think I might serve this either over a slice of toast, or an

ice cream sandwich,

or just eat it out of a little bowl.
Let’s be real about sugary sauces, and why we make them, ok?

Here are some of the recipes I looked at, to make my own:
https://shop.mybluprint.com/cooking/article/easy-bananas-foster/

https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/easy-bananas-foster-11474

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The Tinderbox, by Beverly Lewis; book review

This is the story of an Old Order Amish family whose dad holds a secret.  Sylvia Miller is the eighteen year old daughter who discovers something about the secret, but only partially.

Earnest and Rhoda Miller are her parents, her dad is a converted Englisher, and was accepted into the community years ago by the head Bishop at that time.  Earnest makes a living building and repairing clocks, and does well at it, working in his shop for long hours sometimes.  The Tinderbox, which holds keepsakes of Earnest,  is kept on a shelf is in his clock shop, and Sylvia gives in to curiosity and temptation one day while dusting the shelves in there, looking through all the contents of her dad’s Tinderbox.

Eventually her dad finds out Sylvia has looked, and he doesn’t tell her much, but really struggles with revealing his secret to his wife.  The story then concentrates itself on that struggle, and what the secret being revealed does to his family and himself.  Several other stories are parallel to this one in the book, one about Rhoda’s sister Hannah, and another about Sylvia and her beau.

Personally, I did not really enjoy this book like I have enjoyed Beverly Lewis’s past books.  This one seemed to be aimed more at the teen audience, except for the one slightly amorous scene between husband and wife, I think it would have been suitable for teens.

This was an easy read, although I didn’t read every page, and did skip a few chapters.  I just couldn’t really get into it.  Other fans of Beverly Lewis may find The Tinderbox to be a good, enjoyable read for them.

I am received a copy of The Tinderbox from Bethany House  in exchange for an honest review. I was under no obligation to provide a positive review, and received no monetary compensation.

Romans 10:9-13;  John 3:16-21

Book Review “With Winter’s First Frost” by Kelly Irvin

This is a well thought-out story of a 73 year old widow, by the name of Laura Kauffman, who wonders if God still has a purpose for her, after the death of her husband Eli.  Told from an accurate and empathetic viewpoint, I enjoyed this book’s depth of meaning and the realistic characters, Laura, Zechariah, Ruby, Hannah, Mary Katherine, Jennie, and Abel.

A handy reference guide is at the beginning of the book, which explains who is whom, in each family, and…a glossary of the German dialect spoken by the Amish people in this particular community, which I thought were so helpful in keeping things smooth and understandable!

Zechariah is a widower who is in the early stages of Parkinson’s disease.  Kelly Irvin dealt with this illness and it’s toll on the victim with much insight and compassion.  My own dad died from complications due to Parkinson’s, and each situation Zechariah was in, brought back a memory.

As a mature older woman, Laura’s perspective was one I, and other older women, can relate to.  Even if you’re not a senior citizen yet, I think you can gain some wisdom and knowledge about life after 50, if you read With Winter’s First Frost.  Kelly presented a strong spiritual message, faith and hope in Jesus and God.  I do recommend this book to people who want to read a story with substance and cohesiveness, that’s easy to relate to in one way or another.   Thank you, Kelly Irvin.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html>

Which Way Home? by Linda Byler, book 2

Last night I finished reading Which Way Home?, which is book 2 in Hester’s Hunt for Home, by Linda Byler. 

Characters in this book are :  Hester Zug, Amish/Indian young woman

Hans and Annie Zug, her parents, but Annie is the stepmother. Her mother Kate, died.

Noah, Isaac, and other siblings to Hester.

Emma Feree, a kindly woman who takes in runaways, abandoned children, and orphans.

Billy, her adopted son

Walter Trout, Emma’s neighbor

William King, ex-boyfriend of Hester Zug

Bappie, a single woman, and Amish friend of Hester’s

The story begins with Hester running away from her Amish community, and hoping to find and join a community of Lenape Indians.  Mrs. Byler writes in detail about the skills Hester has to use in order to survive as she travels hidden in the woods.  Finding water sources, food, safe places to sleep, staying hidden, are all described in the first few chapters, and it was engrossing to me.

She does stumble upon a Lenape tribe, and they take her in and nurse her back to health.  She lives with them for a while, learning about her heritage. 

Hester decides to leave the Lenape, and ends up being found by Emma Feree, a wonderful woman who “adopts” Hester, and they live together in Emma’s home for a long time.  Hester finds love and acceptance there, and begins to form an idea as to what she would like to do with her life.

I don’t want to go into a lot of detail about Which Way Home, because it’s a VERY good book to read, quite fascinating, and I hope you will find a copy for yourself, and enjoy reading.  As a matter of fact, I liked this book 2 so much, I’ve bought a copy of book 1,  “Hester on the Run”, written in 2015.  Here’s a page of all of Linda Byler’s books:  https://www.bookseriesinorder.com/linda-byler/

About the author:

About the Author

BookLook Bloggers

Well, praise JESUS, now I’m a part of the team at BookLook Bloggers!  I’m so pleased!

I’ve requested With Winter’s First Frost, by Kelly Irvin, and should be receiving a copy in a couple of weeks.  Here’s the book, and it does have several in a series, which I might read later:

The titles of the others in this series are:  Upon a Spring Breeze, Beneath the Summer Sun, and  Through the Autumn Air.  I hope you get time to read them, too!

Have a great day, and read your Bible every day!  It is Life, and Light, and in it you will find salvation, peace, wisdom, and rest in this sometimes crazy world.

God bless you all, and thank you for reading my blog!  Follow Jesus!  Ye must be born again.

Read Romans 10:9-13, and then do what it says: [8] But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach;
[9] That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.
[10] For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.
[11] For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.
[12] For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him.
[13] For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved. 

Romans 10:9-13; John 3:16-21

A Silken Thread by Kim Vogel Sawyer

I received an advance reader copy of A Silken Thread from Waterbrook, a division of Penguin Random House, LLC, in exchange for an honest review.

A Silken Thread was about Laurel Millard and her plans to capture a wealthy suitor who can afford care for her mother and give Laurel the life she dreams about.  She gets hired as a silk weaver at the Atlanta Cotton Exposition of 1895, and works at a loom most of the day, making lengths of silk for display and educational purposes aimed at the visitors to the Silk Room at the Exposition.

Laurel meets Willie Sharp, a security guard at the exposition,  Langdon Rochester, the son of the owner of Rochester Steam Engines company, and a few young women who work with her in the Silk Room, giving guided tours of that area.  She also meets Quincy, a friend of Willie’s, who is hired as a groundskeeper at the exposition.

The book is well written, and the characters all connect nicely with each other.  Mrs. Sawyer is skilled in blending the stories of each person into a good, solid historical fiction tale, which keeps the reader interested and engaged.   I thoroughly appreciated her use of the King James bible when she wrote Scriptures into the stories, and she placed them appropriately.  They added so much value to the whole book.    I also liked the information about the Cotton Exposition, how the grounds were described in detail, which gave me a good picture of what they must have looked like.

Mrs. Sawyer dealt with racism in the book, too.  In my opinion, she portrayed one character in particular well, and gave him insightful thought processing, which helped him overcome some things.  Each character, really, matured and became more experienced in their views of life, and how people act.  I liked the book, and do recommend it to anyone wanting a clean historical fiction story, with very little romance in it, and a LOT of substance!

Book Review: Stephen Mitchell’s Journey

Book Review: Stephen Mitchell’s Journey
Author: Isabella Alden
Characters: The Mitchell family: Pa, named Josiah, ma, named Phoebe, Sarah Jane, and Stephen
The Lucas family: mother, a dad who was a drunkard, Flora Ann, Meme,
Dele, Miranda, and Jake.
The Ransoms, Maxwell, the preacher of the area, and Helen, his sister, who lives with him
Gertrude Temple, ex girlfriend of Maxwell, and Hilary Colchester, a friend of Helen.

The Mitchells live on a farm which hasn’t been taken care of very well, so it’s run down and the farmhouse is dilapidated.  The soil is stony and depleted.
The Lucas’s live on an even worse piece of land, in a desolate looking shack of a home, which had become that way due to the father’s alcoholism and the son’s drunkenness and abuse of the family.
The story is a good picture of Godly Christian charity, of how to help others with what you have, even though it may not be much by the world’s standards. How Christians should do what they can to uplift and improve another’s circumstances, and how they should first and foremost, tell their neighbors about salvation through
Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God.  
It is also an illustration of how Christians can even help those who may be out to harm them, through patience, prayer, and kindness. How we should be alert for opportunities to do the Master’s work, and follow where He leads us.

The story, Stephen Mitchell’s Journey, is extremely well-written, organized, and flows smoothly from one family’s story to another, interconnecting with grace and thought-provoking ideas.

This story was in the book titled Grace Livingston Hill Collection No. 7, four complete novels, 3 by Grace Hill, and one by Isabella Alden. Published by Barbour Books. ISBN: 1-57748-825-3

Some background on Isabella Alden:Four complete novels

I found this pretty website about the author:https://isabellaalden.com/
A list of her books:
https://www.thriftbooks.com/a/isabella-macdonald-alden/248890/

Book Launching and Book Reviewing

Pretty soon, I’ll be reading these 2 new books, for Bethany House, and the other from Waterbrook and Multnomah!  One is THE TINDERBOX, by Beverly Lewis, and the other is

A SILKEN THREAD, by Kim Vogel Sawyer!  I’m really looking forward to reading both of these!  I love the storyline of Silken Thread, and I’ve almost always enjoyed Beverly Lewis’s  books.

Keep checking back for my reviews. THANKS!

Romans 10:  8-13;  John 3:16-21

 

Between Two Shores, by Jocelyn Green

Between Two Shores book review

This book was one of the best history lessons I’ve ever had. I knew almost nothing about the French and Indian war, which was a more of a war between the British colonies in America,and
the French. France eventually lost all Canadian land, and Britain got Florida and Upper Canada.
Jocelyn Green wrote about this war by introducing readers to Catherine Duval, the daughter of a
mixed race marriage, who was half French and half Mohawk. Catherine was a trader with
both the British and the French, and she managed a store on Lachine Island in Canada, along
with her abusive alcoholic father, and her sister Bright Star. A young woman named Thankful also
lived there, and her story is worth learning about, too. I won’t give it away here, though.
Catherine continues to trade and make money, until Samuel Crane, her ex-fiance shows up, and claims to have some secret information that he needs to share with a British officer. He needs Catherine to help
him deliver that information, and she is drawn to help Samuel because her people are starving
and the war is looming closer to her home.

 
This story takes you on a really intense and interesting journey through the lands and rivers
of Canada. During the trip, you almost feel as if you were part of the group, and when
a surprise turn of events happens, it’s really startling. Jocelyn Green is a talented storyteller,
weaving tons of facts into the lives of her characters, all of whom were inspired by the experiences of
real people.
This book also tells you about how God loves you, and sent His only Son, Jesus Christ, as a ransom
for many, to redeem you and set you free from sin.  That is the most important part of this book.

If you like Christian historical fiction, this would be
a good book for you to read.
I was part of Mrs. Green’s launch team, and was given a free copy of her book, in exchange for
a review and promotion of the book. My review is honest and totally my own.
Romans 10:9-13; John 3:16-21

Ribbon of Gold, by Cathy Marie Hake ~ book review

Ribbon of Gold by Cathy Marie Hake is part of a 4-novella book, called Woven Hearts.  Ribbon of Gold is about Isabel Shaw, a young woman who works at Stedman Mills in Massachusetts, weaving thirty-inch wide shirting on industrial sized looms.  She had left her family’s farm in New Hampshire to work at the textile mill so she could put money aside for her brother’s education.

Carter Stedman, the mill owner’s son, takes over running the operations, and is angered at the inhumane working conditions there.  He goes about righting the wrongs of his father, now deceased, and in the process, becomes enamored with Isabel.

The story is clean, and a comfortable read for any Christian woman.  The relationships in the story are interesting.   I liked the details Mrs. Hake included in Ribbon of Gold, which gives the reader a good picture of how it was to work in the cotton mills in 1846.