Daughter of the Regiment~ Book Review

Daughter of the Regiment by Stephanie Grace Whitson

This is a delightful book! Stephanie has successfully woven historical fact with the fictitious Malone family, an Irish immigrants living on a small farm in Little Dixie, Missouri, in 1861, approximately one month after the Civil War had started.   Little Dixie is a historic 13- to 17-county region of mid-to-upper-mid Missouri along the Missouri River, settled at first primarily by migrants from the hemp and tobacco districts of Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee.    During the war, Missouri was claimed by both the Union and the Confederacy, had two competing state governments, and sent representatives to both the United States Congress and the Confederate Congress.(from Wikipedia)

The other main, or co-star character in the book is Libbie, a true Southern belle, wealthy, and living with her abusive brother, Walker, on their plantation.  Stephanie’s descriptions of Libbie, her way of talking, her mannerisms, are all accurate reflections of how women were in the South. Part of the war ends up taking place on their plantation, Wildwood Grove.

Feelings and characters of the plantation slaves have an honest light shown on them.  I liked the way the author presented their points of views.

The Civil War scenes are intense.  Her descriptions of the fights on the  battlefields are vivid.   She gives just enough details of the war to keep interest going, yet she doesn’t get overly graphic.  Realistic, but not without hope and courageous acts by others.

If you like Christian historical fiction, and the Civil War, this is a must-read!

Romans 10:9-13;  John 3:16-21

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No Ocean Too Wide ~ Book review

No Ocean Too Wide, by Carrie Turansky, is a riveting story of a family in England caught up in the wretched child immigration scheme of the British Home Children,  in the early 1900s.  She includes an impressive amount of facts to make this Christian historical fiction one of the most compelling reads I’ve encountered in a while on the subject of orphans, and cold-hearted money-making schemes involving basically, the trafficking of children.

They either took them from homes under questionable pretenses, or brought them in from the streets, and then put them on a ship bound for Canada, to live as a domestic servant in someone’s home.  Ages as young as 5, and as old as 17, I believe, were forced to work as drudges, in many cases.

The characters in her book are Laura McAlister, and her siblings Garth, Katie, and Grace.  Their mother, and their father, the neighbor Mrs. Graham,  and Mrs. Palmer, the employee of Laura’s mother.

Andrew Bolton is also a key character.  He is a wealthy lawyer, and he and his friend are sent, by the British government,to  investigate the goings-on of the children’s orphanages.  Suspicion had arisen because of one Dr. Barnardo, who supposedly took in hundreds of abandoned children from the streets of England, and gave them food, shelter, and useful skills. Dr. Barnardo was constantly in and out of court.

This is a great historical lesson which helps bring awareness on one of Britain’s unsavory and repugnant chapters.  I do recommend this for reading.  Geared for adult comprehension, not really on a level that a teen or child would be able to grasp the significance of.

Ester Reid’s Awakening ~ Book Review

Timeless Christian message!  One of being circumspect and watchful in your life as a Christian.  Examine yourself, judge YOURSELF, so you won’t be judged by God!  Hebrews 2:1-3  comes to my mind, when thinking about the book:  [1] Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard, lest at any time we should let them slip.
[2] For if the word spoken by angels was stedfast, and every transgression and disobedience received a just recompence of reward;
[3] How shall we escape, if we neglect so great salvation; which at the first began to be spoken by the Lord, and was confirmed unto us by them that heard him;

Ester Reid was a typical lukewarm Christian, who believed she was quite pious and long-suffering, when in fact she was the opposite.  She helps to run her family’s boardinghouse, and works long hours, cooking, cleaning, and caring for sick residents.

During a visit to a long-time friend’s house, Ester’s conscience gets an awakening.

Isabella Macdonald Alden was a gifted Christian writer.  Learn more about her here: https://www.librarything.com/author/aldenisabella

Read some of her books free, online, here: http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Alden%2C%20Isabella%20Macdonald%2C%201841%2D1930

 

Product details

  • Series: The Alden Collection
  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Creation House (September 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0884193209
  • ISBN-13: 978-088419320

ROMANS 10:8-13 – [8] But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach;
[9] That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.
[10] For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.
[11] For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.
[12] For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him.
[13] For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.

 

 

 

Hester on the Run book review

I like Linda Byler’s style of writing, and her characters are always interesting, and this book was just as good as her others I’ve read.

I liked the unusual way Hester was found, in the woods, abandoned, and how her adopted mother and dad, Kate and Hans, loved her and took great care of her, bringing her up in the Amish way of life.  Even though Hester was Indian, her family and neighbors, for the most part, were friendly and supportive of the arrangement. 

What I didn’t like was, Han’s almost creepy obsession with Hester. I was wondering at one point if he was going to be a pedophile.   Plus, throughout the story, Byler lets us know Kate feels slighted, and is sad that Hans ignores their other children, and holds Hester above all of them. 

Idolatry of a child is not a good thing, in God’s ways.

The story kept my interest, and Byler is a good author, always tells a believable Christian fiction story.

I hope she continues to write for the Christian community . 

Missing Isaac ~ book review

This story was set in the 1960s, in a rural area. There was a solid friendship
between a wealthy family, and the people who worked their land, which is uncommon, but
not unheard of. Very well constructed and believable.
They had a lot of employees working in their cotton fields, and treated them with respect.


The characters were interesting, and their Southern way of speech and customs were done very well.
Pete, his family, along with the Picketts, and the town folk were all realistic.
There wasn’t much Christianity in the story, which kind of surprised me, and I hope Valerie
starts talking about Jesus, salvation, and the King James bible in her future books.
She has a real gift from God for telling stories that keep you attention, and that
don’t stress you out reading them.


I recommend this book, because it’s a good, clean read, no trashy romance or
innuendos, and plenty of detailed plots to keep you wanting to read more.
One of the best books I’ve read this year.

Non-Alcoholic Bananas Foster Sauce

Tonight I made bananas foster sauce, with NO alcohol, nor with the rum extract. I just can’t stand the taste of alcohol in my food. (I don’t drink, either, neither did my dad)
After browsing several recipes, I saw that all of them have 4 of the same basic ingredients, so I got out my
saucepan, a banana from Walmart, and the other ingredients.

Before that, I wondered, “What’s the difference between caramel sauce, and non-alkie bananas foster sauce, besides the banana?”
But, I digress.

I made the sauce, using
real salted butter, and plenty of it     

2 tablespoons to caramelize the bananas, and 2 or 3 for the sauce
3/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon or so of ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon or so of regular iodized table salt
a banana, sliced
2 tablespoons of whole milk

First, cut the banana in slices, then melt a couple of tablespoons of
butter and a teaspoon of dark brown sugar in the saucepan. Cook the banana slices, flipping them over once. Pour them onto a plate, and set aside.

Next, start melting a couple of tablespoons more of butter in the saucepan, dump the
brown sugar (3/4 cup packed), cinnamon, about a half teaspoon, and salt (about a half a teaspoon)
and stir that over medium high heat, adding the milk. Stir, stir, stir, until it’s bubbly but not boiling.
Add the bananas, and stir a little while longer, maybe a minute or so, then take it all off the burner.
My banana slices kind of melted, or something, but that added a lot of flavor to the sauce!

Here’s the sauce, using my recipe!


Let it cool a bit, then dip your spoon in, and taste it. Share it with your husband, or a family
member who appreciates this yummy stuff.
I’m telling you, this recipe is DELICIOUS!!

I think I might serve this either over a slice of toast, or an

ice cream sandwich,

or just eat it out of a little bowl.
Let’s be real about sugary sauces, and why we make them, ok?

Here are some of the recipes I looked at, to make my own:
https://shop.mybluprint.com/cooking/article/easy-bananas-foster/

https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/easy-bananas-foster-11474

The Tinderbox, by Beverly Lewis; book review

This is the story of an Old Order Amish family whose dad holds a secret.  Sylvia Miller is the eighteen year old daughter who discovers something about the secret, but only partially.

Earnest and Rhoda Miller are her parents, her dad is a converted Englisher, and was accepted into the community years ago by the head Bishop at that time.  Earnest makes a living building and repairing clocks, and does well at it, working in his shop for long hours sometimes.  The Tinderbox, which holds keepsakes of Earnest,  is kept on a shelf is in his clock shop, and Sylvia gives in to curiosity and temptation one day while dusting the shelves in there, looking through all the contents of her dad’s Tinderbox.

Eventually her dad finds out Sylvia has looked, and he doesn’t tell her much, but really struggles with revealing his secret to his wife.  The story then concentrates itself on that struggle, and what the secret being revealed does to his family and himself.  Several other stories are parallel to this one in the book, one about Rhoda’s sister Hannah, and another about Sylvia and her beau.

Personally, I did not really enjoy this book like I have enjoyed Beverly Lewis’s past books.  This one seemed to be aimed more at the teen audience, except for the one slightly amorous scene between husband and wife, I think it would have been suitable for teens.

This was an easy read, although I didn’t read every page, and did skip a few chapters.  I just couldn’t really get into it.  Other fans of Beverly Lewis may find The Tinderbox to be a good, enjoyable read for them.

I am received a copy of The Tinderbox from Bethany House  in exchange for an honest review. I was under no obligation to provide a positive review, and received no monetary compensation.

Romans 10:9-13;  John 3:16-21

Book Review “With Winter’s First Frost” by Kelly Irvin

This is a well thought-out story of a 73 year old widow, by the name of Laura Kauffman, who wonders if God still has a purpose for her, after the death of her husband Eli.  Told from an accurate and empathetic viewpoint, I enjoyed this book’s depth of meaning and the realistic characters, Laura, Zechariah, Ruby, Hannah, Mary Katherine, Jennie, and Abel.

A handy reference guide is at the beginning of the book, which explains who is whom, in each family, and…a glossary of the German dialect spoken by the Amish people in this particular community, which I thought were so helpful in keeping things smooth and understandable!

Zechariah is a widower who is in the early stages of Parkinson’s disease.  Kelly Irvin dealt with this illness and it’s toll on the victim with much insight and compassion.  My own dad died from complications due to Parkinson’s, and each situation Zechariah was in, brought back a memory.

As a mature older woman, Laura’s perspective was one I, and other older women, can relate to.  Even if you’re not a senior citizen yet, I think you can gain some wisdom and knowledge about life after 50, if you read With Winter’s First Frost.  Kelly presented a strong spiritual message, faith and hope in Jesus and God.  I do recommend this book to people who want to read a story with substance and cohesiveness, that’s easy to relate to in one way or another.   Thank you, Kelly Irvin.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html>

Which Way Home? by Linda Byler, book 2

Last night I finished reading Which Way Home?, which is book 2 in Hester’s Hunt for Home, by Linda Byler. 

Characters in this book are :  Hester Zug, Amish/Indian young woman

Hans and Annie Zug, her parents, but Annie is the stepmother. Her mother Kate, died.

Noah, Isaac, and other siblings to Hester.

Emma Feree, a kindly woman who takes in runaways, abandoned children, and orphans.

Billy, her adopted son

Walter Trout, Emma’s neighbor

William King, ex-boyfriend of Hester Zug

Bappie, a single woman, and Amish friend of Hester’s

The story begins with Hester running away from her Amish community, and hoping to find and join a community of Lenape Indians.  Mrs. Byler writes in detail about the skills Hester has to use in order to survive as she travels hidden in the woods.  Finding water sources, food, safe places to sleep, staying hidden, are all described in the first few chapters, and it was engrossing to me.

She does stumble upon a Lenape tribe, and they take her in and nurse her back to health.  She lives with them for a while, learning about her heritage. 

Hester decides to leave the Lenape, and ends up being found by Emma Feree, a wonderful woman who “adopts” Hester, and they live together in Emma’s home for a long time.  Hester finds love and acceptance there, and begins to form an idea as to what she would like to do with her life.

I don’t want to go into a lot of detail about Which Way Home, because it’s a VERY good book to read, quite fascinating, and I hope you will find a copy for yourself, and enjoy reading.  As a matter of fact, I liked this book 2 so much, I’ve bought a copy of book 1,  “Hester on the Run”, written in 2015.  Here’s a page of all of Linda Byler’s books:  https://www.bookseriesinorder.com/linda-byler/

About the author:

About the Author

BookLook Bloggers

Well, praise JESUS, now I’m a part of the team at BookLook Bloggers!  I’m so pleased!

I’ve requested With Winter’s First Frost, by Kelly Irvin, and should be receiving a copy in a couple of weeks.  Here’s the book, and it does have several in a series, which I might read later:

The titles of the others in this series are:  Upon a Spring Breeze, Beneath the Summer Sun, and  Through the Autumn Air.  I hope you get time to read them, too!

Have a great day, and read your Bible every day!  It is Life, and Light, and in it you will find salvation, peace, wisdom, and rest in this sometimes crazy world.

God bless you all, and thank you for reading my blog!  Follow Jesus!  Ye must be born again.

Read Romans 10:9-13, and then do what it says: [8] But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach;
[9] That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.
[10] For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.
[11] For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.
[12] For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him.
[13] For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.