No Ocean Too Wide ~ Book review

No Ocean Too Wide, by Carrie Turansky, is a riveting story of a family in England caught up in the wretched child immigration scheme of the British Home Children,  in the early 1900s.  She includes an impressive amount of facts to make this Christian historical fiction one of the most compelling reads I’ve encountered in a while on the subject of orphans, and cold-hearted money-making schemes involving basically, the trafficking of children.

They either took them from homes under questionable pretenses, or brought them in from the streets, and then put them on a ship bound for Canada, to live as a domestic servant in someone’s home.  Ages as young as 5, and as old as 17, I believe, were forced to work as drudges, in many cases.

The characters in her book are Laura McAlister, and her siblings Garth, Katie, and Grace.  Their mother, and their father, the neighbor Mrs. Graham,  and Mrs. Palmer, the employee of Laura’s mother.

Andrew Bolton is also a key character.  He is a wealthy lawyer, and he and his friend are sent, by the British government,to  investigate the goings-on of the children’s orphanages.  Suspicion had arisen because of one Dr. Barnardo, who supposedly took in hundreds of abandoned children from the streets of England, and gave them food, shelter, and useful skills. Dr. Barnardo was constantly in and out of court.

This is a great historical lesson which helps bring awareness on one of Britain’s unsavory and repugnant chapters.  I do recommend this for reading.  Geared for adult comprehension, not really on a level that a teen or child would be able to grasp the significance of.

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Between Two Shores, by Jocelyn Green

Between Two Shores book review

This book was one of the best history lessons I’ve ever had. I knew almost nothing about the French and Indian war, which was a more of a war between the British colonies in America,and
the French. France eventually lost all Canadian land, and Britain got Florida and Upper Canada.
Jocelyn Green wrote about this war by introducing readers to Catherine Duval, the daughter of a
mixed race marriage, who was half French and half Mohawk. Catherine was a trader with
both the British and the French, and she managed a store on Lachine Island in Canada, along
with her abusive alcoholic father, and her sister Bright Star. A young woman named Thankful also
lived there, and her story is worth learning about, too. I won’t give it away here, though.
Catherine continues to trade and make money, until Samuel Crane, her ex-fiance shows up, and claims to have some secret information that he needs to share with a British officer. He needs Catherine to help
him deliver that information, and she is drawn to help Samuel because her people are starving
and the war is looming closer to her home.

 
This story takes you on a really intense and interesting journey through the lands and rivers
of Canada. During the trip, you almost feel as if you were part of the group, and when
a surprise turn of events happens, it’s really startling. Jocelyn Green is a talented storyteller,
weaving tons of facts into the lives of her characters, all of whom were inspired by the experiences of
real people.
This book also tells you about how God loves you, and sent His only Son, Jesus Christ, as a ransom
for many, to redeem you and set you free from sin.  That is the most important part of this book.

If you like Christian historical fiction, this would be
a good book for you to read.
I was part of Mrs. Green’s launch team, and was given a free copy of her book, in exchange for
a review and promotion of the book. My review is honest and totally my own.
Romans 10:9-13; John 3:16-21