No Ocean Too Wide ~ Book review

No Ocean Too Wide, by Carrie Turansky, is a riveting story of a family in England caught up in the wretched child immigration scheme of the British Home Children,  in the early 1900s.  She includes an impressive amount of facts to make this Christian historical fiction one of the most compelling reads I’ve encountered in a while on the subject of orphans, and cold-hearted money-making schemes involving basically, the trafficking of children.

They either took them from homes under questionable pretenses, or brought them in from the streets, and then put them on a ship bound for Canada, to live as a domestic servant in someone’s home.  Ages as young as 5, and as old as 17, I believe, were forced to work as drudges, in many cases.

The characters in her book are Laura McAlister, and her siblings Garth, Katie, and Grace.  Their mother, and their father, the neighbor Mrs. Graham,  and Mrs. Palmer, the employee of Laura’s mother.

Andrew Bolton is also a key character.  He is a wealthy lawyer, and he and his friend are sent, by the British government,to  investigate the goings-on of the children’s orphanages.  Suspicion had arisen because of one Dr. Barnardo, who supposedly took in hundreds of abandoned children from the streets of England, and gave them food, shelter, and useful skills. Dr. Barnardo was constantly in and out of court.

This is a great historical lesson which helps bring awareness on one of Britain’s unsavory and repugnant chapters.  I do recommend this for reading.  Geared for adult comprehension, not really on a level that a teen or child would be able to grasp the significance of.

Ester Reid’s Awakening ~ Book Review

Timeless Christian message!  One of being circumspect and watchful in your life as a Christian.  Examine yourself, judge YOURSELF, so you won’t be judged by God!  Hebrews 2:1-3  comes to my mind, when thinking about the book:  [1] Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard, lest at any time we should let them slip.
[2] For if the word spoken by angels was stedfast, and every transgression and disobedience received a just recompence of reward;
[3] How shall we escape, if we neglect so great salvation; which at the first began to be spoken by the Lord, and was confirmed unto us by them that heard him;

Ester Reid was a typical lukewarm Christian, who believed she was quite pious and long-suffering, when in fact she was the opposite.  She helps to run her family’s boardinghouse, and works long hours, cooking, cleaning, and caring for sick residents.

During a visit to a long-time friend’s house, Ester’s conscience gets an awakening.

Isabella Macdonald Alden was a gifted Christian writer.  Learn more about her here: https://www.librarything.com/author/aldenisabella

Read some of her books free, online, here: http://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupname?key=Alden%2C%20Isabella%20Macdonald%2C%201841%2D1930

 

Product details

  • Series: The Alden Collection
  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: Creation House (September 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0884193209
  • ISBN-13: 978-088419320

ROMANS 10:8-13 – [8] But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach;
[9] That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.
[10] For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.
[11] For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.
[12] For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him.
[13] For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.

 

 

 

Most Important Stories of the Bible ~ book review

I didn’t like this book.  It was shallow, and too simple. I can not and do not recommend this book. In the “Essential Truths” parts, which come at the end of each story, there is a LOT of conjecture and opinion,  which disqualifies it as an essential truth.  Some of them are fine, but watch out, here and there the authors give the idea of what they think is true, but might not be.

Conjecture:  an opinion or conclusion formed on the basis of incomplete information.   

Both authors, Christopher Hudson and Stan Campbell,  are graduates of Wheaton College.  Wheaton College is not a true, pure  bible college any more, it’s full of mysticism and New Age practices:  https://www.lighthousetrailsresearch.com/collegewheaton.htm

Another error about this book is, they use the NIV. ( The New International Version bible. )   The NIV is a per-version of the pure Word of God.  

The NIV & ESV Downgrade the Deity of Christ   They say the spotless Son of God had to be purified! “…their purification” (Luke 2:22).  The KJV says, “…her purification.”   The NIV Teaches the church was Built on Peter     Matthew 16:18 (NIV), “And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church.” Then the footnote says, “Peter means rock.” But Jesus says Peter is a pebble, and the great confession Peter made concerning the Deity of Christ (vs. 16) is the “ROCK” foundation upon which the church is built (1 Cor. 3:11). Matthew 17:21

KJV: Howbeit this kind goeth not out but by prayer and fasting.

NIV: Omitted

NWT: Omitted

Matthew 27:35

KJV: And they crucified him, and parted his garments, casting lots: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, They parted my garments among them, and upon my vesture did they cast lots.
NIV: When they had crucified him, they divided up his clothes by casting lots.
Also, one of the authors has “authored dozens of Bible related books, primarily for youth and seeker markets….”
Seeker friendly pastors are the new cancer on the church.  From the Berean Call’s website:  if you want to attract the lost on the basis of what might interest them, for the most part you will be appealing to and accommodating their flesh.
and….A large part of the evangelical church has developed a pleasure-laden, cruise ship mentality, but it will result in a spiritual Titanic. Seeker-friendly church pastors (and those tempted to climb aboard) need to get on their knees and read the words of Jesus to the church of the Laodiceans (Rev:3:14-21
I can not and do not recommend this book.
I received a free copy of this book, in exchange for an honest review.

Refining Fire ~ Brides of Seattle book 2

This is book 2 in the Brides of Seattle series, by Tracie Peterson.  An excellent book, clean, Christian historical fiction with characters you can sympathize with and identify easily with.   Plenty of solid story line, with Militine, Abrianna, Thane, Wade, the bridal school sisters, Miss Selma, Miss Miriam, and Miss Poisie , and an evil villian who will remain anonymous in this review.  You find out for yourself! 

This book had several biblically sound explanations of how to get to Heaven, how to be born again, which is one of the best things I appreciate about Tracie Peterson’s books.  Devout, and clear to all readers, you can’t read her books without knowing how to be born again.    Romans 10:9-13.

The historical account of the Great Seattle Fire of 1889 was gripping, and tense.  Her descriptions of the city as it burned to the ground was as if you were there, experiencing a flaming inferno all around you.

 

There was also recovery, and plenty of hope and even some humor.  The research she puts into her books, the accuracy, is wonderful.

Enjoy this good read. 

 

Product details

  • Series: Brides of Seattle (Book 2)
  • Paperback: 314 pages
  • Publisher: Bethany House Publishers (July 7, 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780764210624
  • ISBN-13: 978-0764210624
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds

Hester on the Run book review

I like Linda Byler’s style of writing, and her characters are always interesting, and this book was just as good as her others I’ve read.

I liked the unusual way Hester was found, in the woods, abandoned, and how her adopted mother and dad, Kate and Hans, loved her and took great care of her, bringing her up in the Amish way of life.  Even though Hester was Indian, her family and neighbors, for the most part, were friendly and supportive of the arrangement. 

What I didn’t like was, Han’s almost creepy obsession with Hester. I was wondering at one point if he was going to be a pedophile.   Plus, throughout the story, Byler lets us know Kate feels slighted, and is sad that Hans ignores their other children, and holds Hester above all of them. 

Idolatry of a child is not a good thing, in God’s ways.

The story kept my interest, and Byler is a good author, always tells a believable Christian fiction story.

I hope she continues to write for the Christian community . 

All God’s Children~by Anna Schmidt~ book review

A good Christian historical fiction story about World War 2, set in Munich, Germany.  A German-American woman living as nanny and helper in the home of her aunt and uncle, Beth Bridgewater is caught up in some activities which test her and lead her on a path she could not have imagined.

What I liked about this book by Anna Schmidt is, the characters were believable, and easy to identify with.  I liked the descriptions of Munich, and surrounding areas, from Beth’s point of view, which is that of a person NOT being persecuted or harassed, at least not immediately.   There is a glimpse into the home life of a man in the Gestapo, which I thought to be an unusual point of view.

I really liked Anna’s introduction to The White Rose, a resistance movement which, if you haven’t read about it, you really should.

What I disliked about it was, the favorable view that was given to the Quaker doctrine,  which is, that God is in everyone, which is a blatant lie.  They also believe redemption and the Kingdom of Heaven are to be experienced now, in this world, which is also false doctrine.  So, for that reason, I don’t recommend this book.

Too many false teachings which will confuse and lead astray weak Christians, or lost people.

Here is the Truth:

Romans 10:9-13;  John 3:16-21

Missing Isaac ~ book review

This story was set in the 1960s, in a rural area. There was a solid friendship
between a wealthy family, and the people who worked their land, which is uncommon, but
not unheard of. Very well constructed and believable.
They had a lot of employees working in their cotton fields, and treated them with respect.


The characters were interesting, and their Southern way of speech and customs were done very well.
Pete, his family, along with the Picketts, and the town folk were all realistic.
There wasn’t much Christianity in the story, which kind of surprised me, and I hope Valerie
starts talking about Jesus, salvation, and the King James bible in her future books.
She has a real gift from God for telling stories that keep you attention, and that
don’t stress you out reading them.


I recommend this book, because it’s a good, clean read, no trashy romance or
innuendos, and plenty of detailed plots to keep you wanting to read more.
One of the best books I’ve read this year.

The Tinderbox, by Beverly Lewis; book review

This is the story of an Old Order Amish family whose dad holds a secret.  Sylvia Miller is the eighteen year old daughter who discovers something about the secret, but only partially.

Earnest and Rhoda Miller are her parents, her dad is a converted Englisher, and was accepted into the community years ago by the head Bishop at that time.  Earnest makes a living building and repairing clocks, and does well at it, working in his shop for long hours sometimes.  The Tinderbox, which holds keepsakes of Earnest,  is kept on a shelf is in his clock shop, and Sylvia gives in to curiosity and temptation one day while dusting the shelves in there, looking through all the contents of her dad’s Tinderbox.

Eventually her dad finds out Sylvia has looked, and he doesn’t tell her much, but really struggles with revealing his secret to his wife.  The story then concentrates itself on that struggle, and what the secret being revealed does to his family and himself.  Several other stories are parallel to this one in the book, one about Rhoda’s sister Hannah, and another about Sylvia and her beau.

Personally, I did not really enjoy this book like I have enjoyed Beverly Lewis’s past books.  This one seemed to be aimed more at the teen audience, except for the one slightly amorous scene between husband and wife, I think it would have been suitable for teens.

This was an easy read, although I didn’t read every page, and did skip a few chapters.  I just couldn’t really get into it.  Other fans of Beverly Lewis may find The Tinderbox to be a good, enjoyable read for them.

I am received a copy of The Tinderbox from Bethany House  in exchange for an honest review. I was under no obligation to provide a positive review, and received no monetary compensation.

Romans 10:9-13;  John 3:16-21

Which Way Home? by Linda Byler, book 2

Last night I finished reading Which Way Home?, which is book 2 in Hester’s Hunt for Home, by Linda Byler. 

Characters in this book are :  Hester Zug, Amish/Indian young woman

Hans and Annie Zug, her parents, but Annie is the stepmother. Her mother Kate, died.

Noah, Isaac, and other siblings to Hester.

Emma Feree, a kindly woman who takes in runaways, abandoned children, and orphans.

Billy, her adopted son

Walter Trout, Emma’s neighbor

William King, ex-boyfriend of Hester Zug

Bappie, a single woman, and Amish friend of Hester’s

The story begins with Hester running away from her Amish community, and hoping to find and join a community of Lenape Indians.  Mrs. Byler writes in detail about the skills Hester has to use in order to survive as she travels hidden in the woods.  Finding water sources, food, safe places to sleep, staying hidden, are all described in the first few chapters, and it was engrossing to me.

She does stumble upon a Lenape tribe, and they take her in and nurse her back to health.  She lives with them for a while, learning about her heritage. 

Hester decides to leave the Lenape, and ends up being found by Emma Feree, a wonderful woman who “adopts” Hester, and they live together in Emma’s home for a long time.  Hester finds love and acceptance there, and begins to form an idea as to what she would like to do with her life.

I don’t want to go into a lot of detail about Which Way Home, because it’s a VERY good book to read, quite fascinating, and I hope you will find a copy for yourself, and enjoy reading.  As a matter of fact, I liked this book 2 so much, I’ve bought a copy of book 1,  “Hester on the Run”, written in 2015.  Here’s a page of all of Linda Byler’s books:  https://www.bookseriesinorder.com/linda-byler/

About the author:

About the Author

BookLook Bloggers

Well, praise JESUS, now I’m a part of the team at BookLook Bloggers!  I’m so pleased!

I’ve requested With Winter’s First Frost, by Kelly Irvin, and should be receiving a copy in a couple of weeks.  Here’s the book, and it does have several in a series, which I might read later:

The titles of the others in this series are:  Upon a Spring Breeze, Beneath the Summer Sun, and  Through the Autumn Air.  I hope you get time to read them, too!

Have a great day, and read your Bible every day!  It is Life, and Light, and in it you will find salvation, peace, wisdom, and rest in this sometimes crazy world.

God bless you all, and thank you for reading my blog!  Follow Jesus!  Ye must be born again.

Read Romans 10:9-13, and then do what it says: [8] But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach;
[9] That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.
[10] For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.
[11] For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.
[12] For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him.
[13] For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.