All God’s Children~by Anna Schmidt~ book review

A good Christian historical fiction story about World War 2, set in Munich, Germany.  A German-American woman living as nanny and helper in the home of her aunt and uncle, Beth Bridgewater is caught up in some activities which test her and lead her on a path she could not have imagined.

What I liked about this book by Anna Schmidt is, the characters were believable, and easy to identify with.  I liked the descriptions of Munich, and surrounding areas, from Beth’s point of view, which is that of a person NOT being persecuted or harassed, at least not immediately.   There is a glimpse into the home life of a man in the Gestapo, which I thought to be an unusual point of view.

I really liked Anna’s introduction to The White Rose, a resistance movement which, if you haven’t read about it, you really should.

What I disliked about it was, the favorable view that was given to the Quaker doctrine,  which is, that God is in everyone, which is a blatant lie.  They also believe redemption and the Kingdom of Heaven are to be experienced now, in this world, which is also false doctrine.  So, for that reason, I don’t recommend this book.

Too many false teachings which will confuse and lead astray weak Christians, or lost people.

Here is the Truth:

Romans 10:9-13;  John 3:16-21

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Missing Isaac ~ book review

This story was set in the 1960s, in a rural area. There was a solid friendship
between a wealthy family, and the people who worked their land, which is uncommon, but
not unheard of. Very well constructed and believable.
They had a lot of employees working in their cotton fields, and treated them with respect.


The characters were interesting, and their Southern way of speech and customs were done very well.
Pete, his family, along with the Picketts, and the town folk were all realistic.
There wasn’t much Christianity in the story, which kind of surprised me, and I hope Valerie
starts talking about Jesus, salvation, and the King James bible in her future books.
She has a real gift from God for telling stories that keep you attention, and that
don’t stress you out reading them.


I recommend this book, because it’s a good, clean read, no trashy romance or
innuendos, and plenty of detailed plots to keep you wanting to read more.
One of the best books I’ve read this year.

The Tinderbox, by Beverly Lewis; book review

This is the story of an Old Order Amish family whose dad holds a secret.  Sylvia Miller is the eighteen year old daughter who discovers something about the secret, but only partially.

Earnest and Rhoda Miller are her parents, her dad is a converted Englisher, and was accepted into the community years ago by the head Bishop at that time.  Earnest makes a living building and repairing clocks, and does well at it, working in his shop for long hours sometimes.  The Tinderbox, which holds keepsakes of Earnest,  is kept on a shelf is in his clock shop, and Sylvia gives in to curiosity and temptation one day while dusting the shelves in there, looking through all the contents of her dad’s Tinderbox.

Eventually her dad finds out Sylvia has looked, and he doesn’t tell her much, but really struggles with revealing his secret to his wife.  The story then concentrates itself on that struggle, and what the secret being revealed does to his family and himself.  Several other stories are parallel to this one in the book, one about Rhoda’s sister Hannah, and another about Sylvia and her beau.

Personally, I did not really enjoy this book like I have enjoyed Beverly Lewis’s past books.  This one seemed to be aimed more at the teen audience, except for the one slightly amorous scene between husband and wife, I think it would have been suitable for teens.

This was an easy read, although I didn’t read every page, and did skip a few chapters.  I just couldn’t really get into it.  Other fans of Beverly Lewis may find The Tinderbox to be a good, enjoyable read for them.

I am received a copy of The Tinderbox from Bethany House  in exchange for an honest review. I was under no obligation to provide a positive review, and received no monetary compensation.

Romans 10:9-13;  John 3:16-21

Which Way Home? by Linda Byler, book 2

Last night I finished reading Which Way Home?, which is book 2 in Hester’s Hunt for Home, by Linda Byler. 

Characters in this book are :  Hester Zug, Amish/Indian young woman

Hans and Annie Zug, her parents, but Annie is the stepmother. Her mother Kate, died.

Noah, Isaac, and other siblings to Hester.

Emma Feree, a kindly woman who takes in runaways, abandoned children, and orphans.

Billy, her adopted son

Walter Trout, Emma’s neighbor

William King, ex-boyfriend of Hester Zug

Bappie, a single woman, and Amish friend of Hester’s

The story begins with Hester running away from her Amish community, and hoping to find and join a community of Lenape Indians.  Mrs. Byler writes in detail about the skills Hester has to use in order to survive as she travels hidden in the woods.  Finding water sources, food, safe places to sleep, staying hidden, are all described in the first few chapters, and it was engrossing to me.

She does stumble upon a Lenape tribe, and they take her in and nurse her back to health.  She lives with them for a while, learning about her heritage. 

Hester decides to leave the Lenape, and ends up being found by Emma Feree, a wonderful woman who “adopts” Hester, and they live together in Emma’s home for a long time.  Hester finds love and acceptance there, and begins to form an idea as to what she would like to do with her life.

I don’t want to go into a lot of detail about Which Way Home, because it’s a VERY good book to read, quite fascinating, and I hope you will find a copy for yourself, and enjoy reading.  As a matter of fact, I liked this book 2 so much, I’ve bought a copy of book 1,  “Hester on the Run”, written in 2015.  Here’s a page of all of Linda Byler’s books:  https://www.bookseriesinorder.com/linda-byler/

About the author:

About the Author

BookLook Bloggers

Well, praise JESUS, now I’m a part of the team at BookLook Bloggers!  I’m so pleased!

I’ve requested With Winter’s First Frost, by Kelly Irvin, and should be receiving a copy in a couple of weeks.  Here’s the book, and it does have several in a series, which I might read later:

The titles of the others in this series are:  Upon a Spring Breeze, Beneath the Summer Sun, and  Through the Autumn Air.  I hope you get time to read them, too!

Have a great day, and read your Bible every day!  It is Life, and Light, and in it you will find salvation, peace, wisdom, and rest in this sometimes crazy world.

God bless you all, and thank you for reading my blog!  Follow Jesus!  Ye must be born again.

Read Romans 10:9-13, and then do what it says: [8] But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach;
[9] That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved.
[10] For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.
[11] For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.
[12] For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him.
[13] For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved. 

Romans 10:9-13; John 3:16-21

A Silken Thread by Kim Vogel Sawyer

I received an advance reader copy of A Silken Thread from Waterbrook, a division of Penguin Random House, LLC, in exchange for an honest review.

A Silken Thread was about Laurel Millard and her plans to capture a wealthy suitor who can afford care for her mother and give Laurel the life she dreams about.  She gets hired as a silk weaver at the Atlanta Cotton Exposition of 1895, and works at a loom most of the day, making lengths of silk for display and educational purposes aimed at the visitors to the Silk Room at the Exposition.

Laurel meets Willie Sharp, a security guard at the exposition,  Langdon Rochester, the son of the owner of Rochester Steam Engines company, and a few young women who work with her in the Silk Room, giving guided tours of that area.  She also meets Quincy, a friend of Willie’s, who is hired as a groundskeeper at the exposition.

The book is well written, and the characters all connect nicely with each other.  Mrs. Sawyer is skilled in blending the stories of each person into a good, solid historical fiction tale, which keeps the reader interested and engaged.   I thoroughly appreciated her use of the King James bible when she wrote Scriptures into the stories, and she placed them appropriately.  They added so much value to the whole book.    I also liked the information about the Cotton Exposition, how the grounds were described in detail, which gave me a good picture of what they must have looked like.

Mrs. Sawyer dealt with racism in the book, too.  In my opinion, she portrayed one character in particular well, and gave him insightful thought processing, which helped him overcome some things.  Each character, really, matured and became more experienced in their views of life, and how people act.  I liked the book, and do recommend it to anyone wanting a clean historical fiction story, with very little romance in it, and a LOT of substance!

Between Two Shores, by Jocelyn Green

Between Two Shores book review

This book was one of the best history lessons I’ve ever had. I knew almost nothing about the French and Indian war, which was a more of a war between the British colonies in America,and
the French. France eventually lost all Canadian land, and Britain got Florida and Upper Canada.
Jocelyn Green wrote about this war by introducing readers to Catherine Duval, the daughter of a
mixed race marriage, who was half French and half Mohawk. Catherine was a trader with
both the British and the French, and she managed a store on Lachine Island in Canada, along
with her abusive alcoholic father, and her sister Bright Star. A young woman named Thankful also
lived there, and her story is worth learning about, too. I won’t give it away here, though.
Catherine continues to trade and make money, until Samuel Crane, her ex-fiance shows up, and claims to have some secret information that he needs to share with a British officer. He needs Catherine to help
him deliver that information, and she is drawn to help Samuel because her people are starving
and the war is looming closer to her home.

 
This story takes you on a really intense and interesting journey through the lands and rivers
of Canada. During the trip, you almost feel as if you were part of the group, and when
a surprise turn of events happens, it’s really startling. Jocelyn Green is a talented storyteller,
weaving tons of facts into the lives of her characters, all of whom were inspired by the experiences of
real people.
This book also tells you about how God loves you, and sent His only Son, Jesus Christ, as a ransom
for many, to redeem you and set you free from sin.  That is the most important part of this book.

If you like Christian historical fiction, this would be
a good book for you to read.
I was part of Mrs. Green’s launch team, and was given a free copy of her book, in exchange for
a review and promotion of the book. My review is honest and totally my own.
Romans 10:9-13; John 3:16-21

Ribbon of Gold, by Cathy Marie Hake ~ book review

Ribbon of Gold by Cathy Marie Hake is part of a 4-novella book, called Woven Hearts.  Ribbon of Gold is about Isabel Shaw, a young woman who works at Stedman Mills in Massachusetts, weaving thirty-inch wide shirting on industrial sized looms.  She had left her family’s farm in New Hampshire to work at the textile mill so she could put money aside for her brother’s education.

Carter Stedman, the mill owner’s son, takes over running the operations, and is angered at the inhumane working conditions there.  He goes about righting the wrongs of his father, now deceased, and in the process, becomes enamored with Isabel.

The story is clean, and a comfortable read for any Christian woman.  The relationships in the story are interesting.   I liked the details Mrs. Hake included in Ribbon of Gold, which gives the reader a good picture of how it was to work in the cotton mills in 1846.

Starting from Scratch ~ book review~

Starting from Scratch is enjoyable from start to finish. Entertaining and rich in details, Kate Lloyd masterfully weaves the lives of her characters into a captivating story, rewarding the reader with a highly satisfying read that is difficult to put down. When I finished the book I found I wanted to read more of Kate’s books, and God willing, I shall. Mrs. Lloyd truly has a God-given talent for writing, and I do hope to see many more books from her pen.

Starting from Scratch is told in first-person narrative, and the main character, 29-year-old, unmarried Eva Lapp, presents her day to day life in a way that authentically reflects her struggle

between staying with the Amish community, or cutting the ties and living in the verboten world of Englichers.

She is basically uprooted from her childhood home and relocated into a new job as the manager of a small cafe at a
plant nursery which is fairly close to her old home. I liked how she persevered, and how she handled
uncomfortable situations with

insight and good-natured repartee.

A little bit of romance, not too much, and a lot of skillful relationship building.
Truly a good, clean Christian fiction book about the Amish, I recommend this to anyone who enjoys
Christian fiction.

Starting from Scratch (Lancaster Discoveries Book 2), reads very nicely as a stand alone
novel, too.

Kate Lloyd, author of Starting from Scratch:  

Her Website:  http://katelloyd.com/

Kate’s Blog:  http://katelloyd.com/blog/  Connect with Kate:  https://twitter.com/KateLloydAuthor

Her pinterest pages: https://www.pinterest.com/katelloydauthor/

Kate Lloyd on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/katelloydauthor/

Daughter of the Loom, by Tracie Peterson and Judith Miller

book review Daughter of the Loom
by Tracie Peterson and Judith Miller

This book was excellent, well written and a good story plot that developed
and kept going in a way that kept me interested all the way through.
This is part of the 3 books, Bells of Lowell series, and this is book one.
The story takes place in 1828, in Lowell, Massachusetts, during the Industrial Revolution
of America. In Chapter One, the main character, Lilly Armbruster, is portrayed as a
determined, but struggling displaced farm girl, who is forced to work in the new
weaving mills because the land her parent’s farm was on was bought, and then developed
for industrial uses. She’s angry, and grieving, because her life has been drastically changed,
and her dad recently died, after her mother.
Other characters are Matthew Cheever,part of the organization that
is running the Lowell mills, Kirk Boott, mill owner, Addie and Mintie, sisters who run
separate boarding houses for the mill workers, and various young women who live
at the boardinghouse, and work in the same mill as Lilly.


The Christian perspective is intertwined in the story, and a couple of times,
you are told how to be born again, and enter the Kingdom of God. Lilly struggles
with her faith at times, but she has a supportive group of people who show her
answers to her conflicts, eventually.
I highly recommend this book, it’s CLEAN Christian historical fiction, and you would
never be embarrassed to be seen reading it. No sexual situations, no questionable relationships. Those types of additions to Christian books just make it cheap and trashy, and, are
becoming somewhat common amongst SOME Christian author’s stories. This book, Daughter of the Loom, has no mention of
anything that conflicts with the Bible, as far as I can tell, so relax, and enjoy learning about the
development of Lowell Massachusetts during part of the Industrial Revolution. It’s a really
enjoyable read, and you can learn some real American history too.

Kirk Boott, Lowell industrialist and investor
child labor in the mills
mill workers in everyday work clothing